Testosterone usp

Fluid and electrolyte disturbances: Retention of sodium, chloride, water, potassium, calcium, and inorganic phosphates.
 
Gastrointestinal: Nausea, cholestatic jaundice, alterations in liver function tests, rarely hepatocellular neoplasms and peliosis hepatis (see WARNINGS ).
 
Hematologic: Suppression of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X, bleeding in patients on concomitant anticoagulant therapy, and polycythemia.
 
Nervous system: Increased or decreased libido, headache, anxiety, depression, and generalized paresthesia.
 
Allergic: Hypersensitivity, including skin manifestations and anaphylactoid reactions.
 
Vascular Disorders: venous thromboembolism

Miscellaneous: Inflammation and pain at the site of intramuscular injection.

Clinical studies of DELATESTRYL did not include sufficient numbers of subjects, aged 65 and older, to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Testosterone replacement is not indicated in geriatric patients who have age-related hypogonadism only (“andropause”), because there is insufficient safety and efficacy information to support such use. Current studies do not assess whether testosterone use increases risks of prostate cancer , prostate hyperplasia , and cardiovascular disease in the geriatric population.

Testosterone propionate was introduced in 1937 by Schering AG in Germany under the brand name Testoviron . [7] It was the first ester of testosterone to be introduced, [8] and was the major form of testosterone used medically before 1960. [7] In the 1950s, longer-acting testosterone esters like testosterone enanthate and testosterone cypionate were introduced and superseded testosterone propionate. [8] Although rarely used nowadays due to its short duration, [9] testosterone propionate remains medically available and is still marketed in the United States . [7] [10]

Testosterone usp

testosterone usp

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